Let Them Eat Kale Pizza for World Food Day

Testing a few versions for the final recipe with WITS chef Laura Culbreth.

Today we bring Kale pizza out of the restaurant and into the cafeteria for World Food Day!  Our effort continues this new school year to support Wellness in the Schools’ work in South Florida to improve what’s on kid’s plates and educate them on healthy eating in the process.  Chef will visit McNicol Middle School in Hollywood at lunch to serve a made-from-scratch Kale Pizza recipe inspired by a menu favorite at Harry’s Pizzeria, sourced and approved by Broward County Public Schools’ Food & Nutrition services.  It’s amazing to know that whole wheat dough, caramelized onions and fresh kale will be on the line! Michael is the South Florida Chef Ambassador to the NYC based non-profit organization, now initiating “Wellness Chefs Move to Broward” after a successful launch last year.  We laid the groundwork for kid-approval too for this recipe, hosting WITS chef Chef Leonor Azpurua and her students at Harry’s Pizzeria in the Miami Design District for a field trip in the spring.  They were able to watch how our pizza is made from flour to table and hear from our kitchen team first-hand.  Chef Leonor said the kids enjoyed the Kale Pizza more than any other pizza they tried. “It was amazing watching the children asking for more kale, and then hearing about it on the bus ride home!”

McNicol approves of Harry’s.

Each month, a local chef will introduce a new scratch cooked menu item to the cafeteria, culminating in nine new healthy and delicious recipes for the Broward school lunch menu, kicking off today with Kale Pizza. WITS chefs in each school will prepare the pizza and train Broward cooks for continued implementation. Each month a new Chef Partner will launch one of their recipes. The goal is to bring serve new healthy restaurant style dishes meals to the children!  Thank you to our restaurant chef partners for their work, including Clark Bowen (Bistro Moderne), Aaron Brooks (Edge Steak & Bar), Julie Frans (Wynwood Yard), Aria Kagan (Whole Foods Market), and Chef Bill Telepan (Oceana, NYC).

Wellness in the Schools is a national non-profit that teaches kids healthy habits to learn and live better. They partner with public schools to provide nutrition and fitness education, healthy scratch-cooked meals and active recess periods. Trained culinary graduates partner with cafeteria staff to feed kids real food, and fitness coaches encourage schools to let kids play. Our approach improves student outcomes and drives systemic, long-term change, shifting school cultures and ultimately fighting the childhood obesity epidemic.

Follow along @harryspizzeria and @wellnessintheschools, one recipe at a time.

Make a Fall Evening in the Miami Design District with Music & Michael’s Genuine®

Compliments to the chef.  And of the Miami Design District!  As we head into a new season here in South Florida, our menu at Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink experiences a little more than daily changes.  Chef de Cuisine Tim Piazza is working in everything from Butternut and Delicata squash, to Honeycrisp apples and Brussels Sprouts and building new dishes around them.  With weekly complimentary concerts in Palm Court, now is the time to get a taste of autumn and make a night of it in the neighborhood.

The Miami Design District kicks off its Performance Series Presented by Knight Foundation this Friday, October 13 with Latin Grammy Nominated and Billboard Latin Music Award Winners, Il Volo.  MGFD gets in the spirit with Coco Loco  ($10) coconut water, rum, pineapple, housemade grenadine, lime and Luxardo, served out of its freshly tapped, green coconut.  Just look for the coconut-strewn bar in front of Ella, where you can also find a selection of wine, beer, water and yes, fresh coconut water, too.  See the schedule posted here, and look forward to a new act each week (Fridays, 6PM, Palm Court 140 NE 39th Street), with the Miami Symphony Orchestra back monthly.  Street, Palm Court Garage and Valet Parking available.   Here are how the leaves fall on the menu (new cocktails at the MGFD bar with Beverage Manager Amanda Fraga and desserts by pastry chef MJ Garcia will be covered in separate posts over the next week!):

Braised Rabbit Leg with roasted cipollini onion, bacon, mustard, whole wheat crepe

“The funny thing is, of course, we live in Miami so it still feels like summer outside but we want to feel the change despite that,” says Piazza.  “The goal is to create dishes that are full of all those ingredients and flavors we love this time of year, but that aren’t too rich or heavy handed.  This what we do best in a nutshell — balance.”

In that case, he’s struck it.  Wood Oven Roasted Sweet Potato becomes a salad with the addition of sprouted lentils, pretty tokyo turnips, peppery upland cress, and the nutty acid of tahini sauce.  A dusting of Aleppo chile gives it that zesty pop. We all look forward to apples turning up, and the pick of the grove for the chefs is the Honeycrisp for its perfect harmony of sweet and tart.  Piazza highlights its crunchy texture tossing it shaved with aromatic fennel in Apple & Fennel Salad, red onion, sunflower seeds, radish, quinoa, greens, goat cheese and mustard vinaigrette.  Luscious Skirt Steak hits refresh with celery, almonds, dates, horseradish crema and sherry.  Click here for a reservation or call 305.573.5550.

 

Introducing the Seasonal Pizza at Harry’s. Fall’s Calabaza is Up First!

Hello October. We’re falling in love with the flavors and ingredients of autumn by taking the opportunity to introduce a new menu item at Harry’s Pizzeria®: the seasonal pizza.  Every 3 months, our neighborhood American pizzeria will introduce a new pie inspired by what’s around us that time of year.  Calabaza is up first, and what a looker she is.

A sweet and savory combination of just the right amount of ingredients balanced to perfection, Calabaza begins with a base of rosemary crema, followed by caramelized onions, Brussels sprouts and layers of shaved calabaza (think beautiful and bright orange pumpkin) of the perfect thickness so it will melt, lasagna-like in the oven with gruyère and fontina cheeses to tie it all together.  A light sprinkling of parmigiano finishes it with its salty, tangy bite.

Harry’s new seasonal offering is meant to give guests something they can come back to enjoy a bunch of times, staying on for a bit longer than the more spontaneous daily special pizza.  They can also look forward to trying something new, when a new season arrives.  Chefs game plan in advance and hone in on an ingredient or two they are inspired by and then build from there. The idea is to arrive at a well-balanced pie, where a small amount of toppings work together to support the overall flavor profile.   Perfection is in what we can take away, not add.  So there’s a formula to ensure it — a sauce or no sauce, a protein, a vegetable (sometimes two, especially if it’s a vegetarian pizza), one or two cheeses, and a garnish.  That’s all.  And our daily-made dough with a hint of honey and wheat flour for a crust bakes to a blistered, tender result in our ovens.

Visit Harry’s Instagram for a video of how it’s made, courtesy @thenaughtyfork and our kitchen manager Chris Cantu in the Design District doing the demo!  The Calabaza seasonal pie is now available for $15 at all locations beginning today.

 

 

Thirsty Thursday, Naturally

“Change happens naturally, and it’s happening all the time,” says Amanda Fraga. “It’s a style that’s inherent to the wine program at Genuine, just like it is in the kitchen.”

Fraga, sommelier and beverage manager at The Genuine Hospitality Group, explains this way of working grounds the restaurant by shaking things up, especially with wines by the glass.  This serves an important purpose for the guest, facilitating trial. It’s a great way for people to try new things without making a big commitment.  They can comfortably step out of their comfort zone.  This dynamic environment not only keeps things fresh and exciting for our guests, but works in much the same way for our team in the restaurant, who is used to experiencing and then having to quickly learn the gamut and describe in approachable terms to diners.  From new grapes and producers, to places of origin and food pairings, it’s an exercise in training and translation on the fly.  Fraga is inspired by their initiative, out of the restaurant, too.

“When they go out to eat, most of our servers are naturally challenging themselves to try new things, interesting wines… Barolo… Nebbiolo,” she continues.  “The lifespan of most by the glass on our list is about 2-3 months, maybe less. Staff will adapt. They are used to changes and their wine knowledge speaks to that.”

So what brings about the change?  Fraga likes to make sure to include a variety of styles and price points.

“I never want to be out of touch with what our guests want to drink,” she says.
“Sometimes I taste a wine when I’m out and just have to have it so people can experience it.”

Other times, it’s more deliberate, out of necessity by virtue of type of wines she brings in.  Smaller producers who are doing interested things — making things naturally with no additives or artificial processes — tend to have more limited supply and will usually run out quicker than others and need to be replaced.   This has trained Fraga to basically be anticipating what the next move is. All the time.  Then, there are the rare occasions when she’ll get a lead.  A trusted friend in the business recommends a new importer to taste with and they bring something cool.

“This basically never happens, so when it does I’m tasting with them right away,” she explains. “Recently my mentor Daniel Toral told me about this small distributor from New York.  He was like, ‘You have to taste with this guy.'”

Seeing how the Chamlija held up against the spice in our octopus set up.

And taste she did, with Greg from City Beautiful, who had just been in the Canary Islands.  Bermejo, a rosado from Lanzarote, known for its volcanic soil and lunar landscape, really impressed her for its likeness to provencal rosé.  Those beloved calling cards — pale pink to orange color, nice rounded acid and hints of stone fruit, light to medium body — not the typical darker fruited expressions of Italian or Spanish origin.  Could this in turn effortlessly engender affinity amongst fans of the classic French style, where it all began, and offer a peek through new glasses?  Why, of course, the perfect segue at the table.

sommelier Dean Forst!

Listan negro is referred to the mission grape since the Spaniards brought it with them to the New World. You’ll hear it called pais in South America,” she says. “This wine is great because it’s familiar but different, so a natural introduction for rosé fans.  Or, if a couple had wanted to go with a bottle of red for the meal, perhaps they would like to share a glass with the oysters they ordered to start?  It’s a bonus.  Enjoy a few sips to accentuate the shellfish.  That’s the beauty of the glass.”

As for trying new things, tasting is baked into the job description and moments like being presented with a (vetted) Turkish wine are ones that Fraga trains for and relishes.  She tastes and tastes, and tastes again (the second sip is really where you can discern flavor profile, anyway)  The what-do-I-like, what-do-my-guests-like and where-can-we-meet-in-the-middle at various points on the sliding scale being the guiding paradigm at play.  She might like something for her own shelf but it doesn’t always mean it’s the right for the restaurant.  Chamlija made the cut.  The call was a simple one. Just don’t ask her to pronounce it!
“I’m going to put a Turkish wine on the list, it better be a Turkish grape!”
Try the Papaskarasi, chamlija “blanc de noirs” thrace, turkey 2015 (13/glass) and Listan Negro, los bermejos, lanzarote, canary islands, spain 2016 (15/glass) as of yesterday (Wine Wednesday!) at Michael’s Genuine and follow @quepasamanda and #mgfdwine on Instagram.  Open your eyes and palate to change.  It all starts with a second taste!

[RECIPE] We Fancy Cheese Puffs | Playing the Temperature Game for Perfect Choux Pastry in Gougères

Wednesday’s Rancher Appreciation Supper (tickets and menu here) at Harry’s Pizzeria® is about more than meats the eye.  The occasion is a celebration of delicious product from a source we trust and can stand behind, a commitment that Michael is making long term for our neighborhood American pizzeria as it grows.  Beef and pork raised right, tastes right.  But what happens behind the scenes to make it all happen for the dinner on the culinary end orchestrates resources and talent across our group, from menu development to execution.

This morning we visited our commissary kitchen where much of the heavy lifting for prep happens for our restaurants and special events to zero in on the process through the humble cheese puff or gougère.  A flurry of activity since 5:00 a.m. dances around not skipping a beat from one item, one hot minute, to the next, cooks methodically Sharpie-striking the day’s butcher paper prep list taped to glass racks. MJ keeps her cool “off to get [her] ass kicked” on the next thing.  Jean checks on Michael’s Genuine’s pastrami in the cabinet smoker wafting a peppery sweetness over the range where MJ begins her pâte à choux.  The key throughout the process is use of temperature and its control.

“What I love about the choux dough is it is so rustic. You have to really get in there with your hands to make something beautiful and simple,” she explains, bringing the water, milk, salt and sugar to a boil in a saucepan before adding the butter and then the flour, paddling, turning and whipping with a wooden spoon aggressively. “Instead of a raising agent like yeast or baking soda, we use a mechanical leavener — moisture from fat and the steam that escapes when heated.”

You’re looking for the “V” to form and then it’s ready to pipe.

MJ prefers her base with a little more flavor so she cuts the water with equal parts milk, adjusting the butter accordingly.  Keeping an eye on moisture content and knowing what to look for at the various stages of cooking will yield the right result.  She likes to finish cooking it by drying it as much as she can on the range.  Looking for a film to form on the bottom of the sauce pan, MJ then takes it just a tad longer over the heat.

“I’m looking for it to become dry enough to sustain the structure of the dough when I add the eggs later,” she adds.  They’ll be tempered with the help of the whiz of a gigantic paddle in the smaller (30 quart) of her two Hobart mixers and a paint job she learned back in culinary school — spreading the dough on the sides of the mixing bowl to let just the right amount of steam escape before adding the eggs so they incorporate perfectly.

“When you are trained originally in pastry you start with traditional French patisserie to learn the basics,” MJ reflects.  “I always rely on the foundation of the technique, but it’s the instinct for cues in the behavior of the technique that develop over time and serve to make a recipe really work.”

Gougères

Yields about 3 dozen

1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 cup whole milk
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces
1 scant cup all-purpose flour
5 large eggs, at room temperature
3/4 cups gruyère, shredded
1/4 cup grated parmigiano reggiano

Pre-heat oven to 375° F.

In a saucepan over medium-high heat bring salt, sugar, milk, 1/2 cup of water and butter to a boil, mixing to combine with a wooden spoon.  When a froth begins to form, turn the heat to medium-low and add the flour.  Mix with wooden spoon continuously for 3-4 minutes or until a light film forms on the bottom. Keep stirring vigorously for another minute or two to dry the dough so it easily pulls away from the pan.  It should have a smooth, paste-like texture. Remove from the heat.  Using the wooden spoon, scoop the dough and spread on the sides of bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment.  This will allow just enough heat to escape before adding the eggs to ease their tempering.  Add the eggs one by one and beat until the dough is thick and shiny, making sure that each egg is completely incorporated before adding the next.  Don’t worry if the dough looks like spaeztle as the eggs are beaten in, this is normal; the dough will come together again.  Let the dough sit for a minute, then beat in the grated cheese. You’re looking for the dough to form a stiff “V” on the paddle, then you are ready to pipe.  Using a rubber spatula, scoop dough into a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip for better control when piping.

Line two baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper — if you are using parchment, you can pipe a small bit of dough on the corners and in the center of the sheet to use as glue for the paper.  Pipe about 1 tablespoon of dough for each gougère leaving about 2 inches between the mounds. Sprinkle each with a little parmigiano.

Slide the baking sheets into the oven and immediately turn the oven temperature down to 325 degrees F.  The initial blast of heat will activate the steam and make them rise, then lowering will dry them out without burning them.  Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the gougères are golden and puffed.  You an also pull one from the oven to test for moisture inside and continue to bake accordingly.  Serve warm, or transfer the pans to racks to cool.