Eat Your Art Out with this Shake Shack x Harry’s Pizzeria Menu Collab

Calling all starving artists!  Fuel your art-going hunger next week as creatives across the globe descend on Miami for our cultural enjoyment with a little collaborative work of our own.  Join Shake Shack® and Harry’s Pizzeria® from Monday, November 28th to Sunday, December 4th as we swap some of our most popular menu items for reimagined, limited edition offerings available exclusively in South Florida.

shake-shack-x-harrys-540x540-1024x1024Harry’s Shorty Burger ($6.89), available at Shake Shack’s Coral Gables (1450 S Dixie Hwy) and Miami Beach (1111 Lincoln Rd) locations, will feature all the toppings of Harry’s signature Short Rib Pizza – juicy slow roasted beef short rib, caramelized onions, arugula and gruyère cheese – all stacked on Shake Shack’s 100% all-natural, antibiotic-free Angus beef burger.

The Shack-cago Pizza ($17.00), available at Harry’s Pizzeria’s Coconut Grove (2996 McFarlane Rd) and Design District (3918 N Miami Ave) locations, will feature the classic flavors of Shake Shack’s Shack-cago Dog® with a fire-roasted Vienna beef hot dog, mustard-mornay cheese sauce, sport peppers, pickles, tomatoes and onions all tied together with fontina cheese and Harry’s tender, blistered pizza crust.

“We’ve never collaborated with a restaurant in this way, and we’re so psyched to be doing it with Harry’s Pizzeria,” said Mark Rosati, Shake Shack Culinary Director.

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Speechless Harry’s Coconut Grove Chef Danny Ramirez with Erik Hugley (back right) at the Coral Gables Shack over the summer, testing out a few of Chef and Mark’s ideas for the Harry’s menu item.

What began as a festive chat at Chef’s House Party over February’s South Beach Wine & Food Festival quickly escalated into action.  Mark was game immediately and the ideas percolated over email. He flew down over the summer to experiment — the decision made itself.

Presenting the goods.

Presenting the goods.

“Chef Michael and I both share an appreciation for the artistic and whimsical elements of food,” he continues.   “So it’s only appropriate to debut this menu swap during the biggest week for art – and the busiest of the year – in Miami.”

It’s been a great experience for Michael and the team on a few levels — the obvious being getting to create in the kitchen, the best and most fun part of being a chef!  And as a growing restaurant group, with the expansion of Harry’s in particular, these kinds of opportunities to learn from respected brands like Shake Shack are key for us to become better as we grow.  And you get to reap the delicious rewards.  Join us next week!

Can't miss it.

Can’t miss it.

[Recipe] Hail Tableside Caesar!

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It’s just better made fresh.

27872392460_b96a2e8753_o-2Caesar Salad is such an old school thing, and it’s a classic for a reason… because it’s really good!  A salad and its dressing are always better – in both taste and consistency – when made fresh.  That’s why Michael decided to do a Caesar Salad tableside at Fi’lia.  This cart was designed from scratch (with a little scale modeling by Director of Licensing Operations and wine guy Eric Larkee!) to be efficient and functional in the room.  However, some of its best attributes are the intangibles, like the ridiculous aroma that wafts through the dining room when the cart is near.  Cue the garlic croutons toasted to order! A cast iron griddle or large pan on your stovetop will do the trick at home. The recipe adds a bit of radicchio to give the salad a bitter note that cuts through the creamy richness of the dressing.  You could choose to leave it out or make it a little fancy like we do in the restaurant with the long and delicate treviso.  Michael and chef de cuisine Tim Piazza will be on NBC 6 this morning showing us how it’s done.  Tune in here at 11:50 a.m. to watch and learn!

Fi’lia Caesar Salad

Serves 4

1 stick unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
2 cloves of garlic, minced
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
Ciabatta loaf, sliced lengthwise
3 cloves of garlic
1 can oil-packed whole white anchovies, filleted and rinsed
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon Worcester sauce
1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
Juice of ½ a lemon
2 ounces grated parmigiano reggiano
2 whole romaine lettuce hearts, washed and thoroughly dried
½ head of radicchio, roughly chopped

Place a cast iron griddle or pan over medium-high heat. In a small bowl, combine butter, minced garlic and salt, mixing with a fork until fully incorporated. Spread in a generous layer onto bread slices. When the griddle is hot but not smoking, place cut side down to toast, turning after 2-3 minutes or when golden brown. Pay attention to croutons so they don’t burn. Once toasted on the other side, remove from the heat and give them a rough chop.

Into a wooden bowl, add the cloves of garlic and rub around the bowl with two forks to mash them up. Then add the anchovies; smash them, too. Add the yolk, mustard, Worcester sauce and pepper and mix with a fork until incorporated. Very slowly whisk in a fine drizzle of extra virgin olive oil to emulsify the dressing. Finish by whisking in the lemon juice to thin it back down and adding the cheese, reserving half for plating. Add the lettuce and radicchio and mix to evenly dress. Plate the salad and top with croutons, then add the remaining cheese.

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Serious Case of the Roman Munchies | Katie Parla’s Viceland Street Food Tour & What You’re Eating at Her Harry’s Pizzeria Pop Up Dinner

Watch and learn people.

Watch and learn people.

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Chef Chris showed us how to make a Capricciosa inspired pie for us yesterday on Facebook Live.

Heat wave, anyone?  F*ck yes, said any Miamian never!  But record breaking temps never stopped Katie Parla from an adventure, especially when it’s showing a little culinary hospitality to Mario Batali and Action Bronson plus ones and twos.  That’s just how one denouements the Italian episode of our favorite new guilty pleasure on Viceland — an epic Roman street food tour of the Eternal City in 110°F weather.

Lucky for Katie and you, it’s cold front season in Miami when she visits Michael’s neighborhood American pizzeria on Wednesday, November 16 to share her delicious new book with us.  You can read all about the infamous Trapizzino and other amazing Roman specialities in your very own signed copy of Tasting Rome, while enjoying bite after transportive bite under one cool roof — Harry’s Pizzeria in the Miami Design District.  Katie’s releasing the menu today.  Check it out below, click to buy some tickets, and watch her show us all how to Roman Holiday and toast with pizza.  Cin cin!

WELCOME COCKTAIL
CINQUIÈME ARRONDISSEMENT DEL GIN CORNER — Gin, St. Germain elderflower liqueur, lemon, egg white, red wine
PASSED
BUTTER & ANCHOVY CROSTINI crostini con burro e alici
BRUSCHETTE WITH SQUASH AND PECORINO ROMANO
bruschette con zucca e pecorino romano
SQUASH BLOSSOM PIZZA pizza romana con fiori di zucca
RICE CROQUETTES WITH PECORINO supplì cacio e pepe
ANTIPASTI
BAKED VEGETABLES WITH BREAD CRUMBS
verdure gratinate al forno
FENNEL, RADICCHIO AND PEAR SALAD
insalata di finocchio, radicchio, e pera
PRIMI
ROSCIOLI’S RIGATONI ALL’ AMATRICIANA
BRAISED OXTAIL GNOCCHI gnocchi al sugo di coda
SECONDI
VITO BERNABEI’S PORCHETTA
ROMANESCO CUSTARD sformatino di broccolo romanesco
DESSERT
APPLE CROSTATA WITH ALMOND CRUST crostata di mela
WINE
PROSECCO Borgoluce, Italy
PECORINO Tiberio, Abruzzo, Italy
LAGRIEN BLEND Manincor “Reserve del Conte” Alto Adige, Italy
NERO DI TROIA Indigenous, Puglia, Italy
“…I am constantly curious about how a cook arrives at his or her personal
recipe. Why does one use pancetta instead of guanciale in carbonara or
introduce Parmigiano Reggiano into the cacio mix? What drives half of Rome’s
chefs to use cocoa powder in their coda and others to leave it out? Tasting Rome
answers these questions. Katie Parla, my dear friend and expert on all things
Rome—particularly food, wine, and beer— has distilled the local culture as only
the most informed and devoted observer could and shows how traditions are ever
evolving.”
~ Mario Batali, foreword

Fi’lia-ing the Love | Michael’s First Italian Concept Opens Wednesday at SLS Brickell

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Puttanesca! My personal favorite pizza, with Pistachio Pesto not far behind.

Meet the newest member of The Genuine Hospitality Group family.  Our beloved James Beard Award-winning Chef and Restaurateur now brings his straightforward approach to ingredient-driven Italian cuisine from the hearth with Fi’lia by Michael Schwartz!  Click here to make a reservation.

The restaurant opens for dinner Wednesday, October 26 at the corner of South Miami Avenue and 13th Street at the brand new SLS Brickell Hotel (1300 South Miami Avenue) in the heart of the neighborhood.  Breakfast and lunch begin the following day.  Valet is available at the hotel entrance off 14th Street connected to the restaurant through its lobby, supplemented with metered parking and street entrance on South Miami Avenue.  Fi’lia is managed and operated under the Disruptive Restaurant Group umbrella of sbe.

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“Fi’lia is ‘honest Italian,’ an expression of the simplicity that I love about this style of food,” Chef explains. “It’s not specific to a particular region. This is the way I like to cook and eat Italian — straightforward and with handmade touches.”

In keeping with Schwartz’s ethos that good food should speak for itself, the premium at Fi’lia is unpretentious food and the experience to match, highlighting the freshest ingredients from the hearth and the attention to warm hospitality for which he’s known.  

Chef and Tim getting their pasta on!

Chef and Tim getting their pasta on!

I overheard this sformato (like a savory Italian custard on the delicate cakey side) with pecorino crema "a memory"... a standout from the Small section.

“A memory” for sure:  sformato (like a savory Italian custard with a delicate cakey texture) with pecorino crema.

Chef de Cuisine Tim Piazza comes to Fi’lia from his post as Sous Chef at Michael’s Genuine, bringing to life Schwartz’s food and approach in this new kitchen. Dinner draws guests in with irresistible Snacks including Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta with stracciatella and basil and Charred Eggplant Spread on freshly grilled bread with grated bottarga. Working down the menu, dishes are conveniently listed by size, ranging from light but satisfying Small dishes like the bright Citrus Salad with pistachio and aged piave vecchio, to a bold and flavorful traditional cut in the Extra Large 42oz Bisteca Fiorentina executed simply on the wood grill with Meyer lemon and rosemary.

A special, not-to-miss part of the Fi’lia experience is its Tableside Caesar, a classic salad presented the old school way – made right in front of the table, dressing and all, which is the point – and tuned to perfection with garlic croutons toasted on the cart.

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Pillows of perfect agnolotti.

Fresh, daily-made Pastas are an important part of the menu and guests can enjoy this handmade touch in a few ways. Delicate, filled bundles of mouth-watering Corn Agnolotti are brought up with a zesty roasted lobster sauce and decadent Braised Short Rib Crespelle are Italian crepes baked to crisp, bubbly decadence with béchamel, taleggio and fontina. There is a nod to the classics in Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe with black pepper and pecorino coating the noodles with just the right amount of sauce, and a more modern approach in Bucatini with the salty, briny punch of bottarga to balance the comforting heat of chile flakes, garlic and breadcrumbs.

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Chicken in the window.

Pizza has pride of place on the menu with perennial favorites like Margherita with tomato, mozzarella and basil in perfect proportion and finished with the restaurant’s own first press, cold press Italian extra-virgin olive oil blend. A taste of something new comes in combinations like Leek & Potato with pancetta, rosemary and trugole, as well as Pistachio Pesto with house made ricotta, charred onion, pecorino – all of them created using the freshest ingredients and Schwartz’s signature restraint.  LargeExtra Large and Sides highlight proteins and vegetables that ground the meal, like Wood Grilled Chicken with savory bread pudding, mustard greens, pine nuts, currants.

Sangreal grey goose, punzone blood orange liqueur, lemon 14 cocktail glass

Samgreal, a nod to sbe Chairman and CEO Sam Nazarian, featuring Grey Goose, Punzone blood orange liqueur, lemon

Nothing at Fi’lia is extraneous, especially in the beverage program.  Drinks are a personal favorite part for me, featuring Cocktails (including chilled lovely bottles of them popped at the table) and Spritz.  At the open kitchen’s bar, cocktails offered are refreshingly uncomplicated—less about complex recipes, and more about how perfect a Spritz is on a July or December afternoon.  There is a section devoted to this Italian afternoon pastime with six including Bicicletta with Campari, white wine and soda water – one of the lowest in alcohol, normally drank before getting on the bicycle and riding home for the evening.   Lacuna with Knob Creek Rye, Carpano Antica and Angostura bitters is one of the bottled delights to love.  Lupa 35 is presented in a flute with Hennessy VS, Averna, Luxardo apricot, prosecco. A beer list of craft and seasonal styles complement a focused wine list of Italian regional varietals and American wines with an old world sensibility.

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The airy décor designed by Philippe Starck also skews towards unadorned simplicity, with a focus on clean lines and unobtrusive, sleek teak furniture and vertically stacked citrus planters that frame the room. It’s a modern take on restrained elegance that allows the food to take center stage.

Fi'lia's Italian olive oil blend

Fi’lia’s Italian olive oil blend, available for sale at $23/500 ml bottle at the restaurant, along with 8oz bags of housemade semolina pasta in four shapes for $8 each.  Find out more here.

Fi’lia includes combined indoor and outdoor seating for up to 116 people and is open every day for breakfast Monday – Sunday 7-11am, lunch Monday – Sunday 11:30am – 2:30pm, and dinner Sunday – Thursday 5:30-10:30pm and Friday & Saturday 5:30pm – 12am, with bar menu of snacks and small dishes served daily from 3-5:30pm. To make a reservation, call 305.912.1729 or email filiamiami@sbe.com.

Wine Wednesday | Amanda Fraga on Her Slow Fires Dinner Pairing & StarChefs Somm Slam

ct_slow-fires-cookbook-dinnerFraga got right to the point. “To be honest, this has been one of the most difficult pairings I’ve had to do here.  Sometimes you look at a menu and it’s more obvious the direction I want to go, like the dishes ask for certain wines. I’ll just say that’s not how this went down!”

Consider it part of our Beverage Manager’s preparation for this weekend’s Star Chefs 7th Annual Somm Slam in NYC, where she’ll be representing Miami as one of 12 sommeliers from across the country going for the title (“somms are just competitive by nature!”) and tested on categories including Tasting, Pairing and Wine Theory.  We’re speaking of the current test at hand, the menu for this coming Tuesday’s Slow Fires cookbook dinner with Chef Justin Smillie.  Tasting the pairings will be that much more delicious with a little back story, as I like to think is true of the experience of wine in general.

“When I’m faced with a really eclectic menu with lots going on, my first instinct is to focus, even oversimplify, each course into one key flavor attribute — usually the strongest one — and pair to that,” Amanda explains of the process.  “Then I can extrapolate from there, to make sure each dish is taken into account to offer a balanced pairing.”

Salads, I learn, are actually one of the most challenging of a meal.

“You want something bright, and a little acid to open up the palate at the beginning of the meal.   But dressing can be highly acidic, so you really need to be careful on the level there,” Amanda continues. “You also have an oil cure on the tuna in Justin’s Riviera Salad, which can be quite rich.  So it’s really all over the place.”

Amanda decided that citrus balanced with pronounced fruit would be a good way to go, so she chose the Sauvignon Blanc, La Garde, Pessac-Leognan, France 2011.  She tells me this wine also brings enough richness and round mouthfeel to match the tuna.

Amanda's current gem

Amanda’s current gem

For Slow Fires’ second course, Fraga’s laser beam fixed on Grilled Quail with broccoli rabe and coal-roasted garlic first, and set Clams with avocado and chile butter off to the side, to be contemplated after.  In Amanda’s estimation, something with fuller flavor, fruit and backbone would work well and Bourgogne came calling.

“Leroy (pronounced Le-wah) is my favorite wine right now at Michael’s Genuine,” Amanda says. “I named one of my fish after the winemaker, Lalou.”

Lalou Bize-Leroy was running the operation at Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, making some of the most expensive wines in the world.  Known for vineyard holdings dating back thousands of years to its abbey days, DRC is steeped in tradition and aggressively harvests, which means they are highly selective when it comes to what fruit is picked.  One shouldn’t be surprised to see many grapes still on the vine when all is said and done.  Amanda knows, she was in Burgundy for the harvest back in 2014.  Ms. Bize-Leroy, who went off and started her own project, continues similar practices — aggressive harvesting and organic viticulture — but in a much more accessible form [read: we can actually afford to drink it!]

“People look at the label and think it’s basic. But the game changes when Bourgogne is coming from a producer who is so good they can compete with the AOCs out there,” Amanda says.  “Ms. Bize-Leroy’s wines very terroir driven, this one in particular. The 2009 vintage is ripe and fleshy which is why I thought it would go great with the quail. It has body to it, but not enough to overpower the clams. This is when the second dish comes into play to ultimate decide on the pairing. It has to all work together.

Short rib cover shot and our main dish at Cypress Tavern's Slow Fires cookbook dinner.

Short rib cover shot and our main dish at Cypress Tavern’s Slow Fires cookbook dinner.

Amanda accessed her short rib know-how (yes, she has plenty from working Genuine’s menu over the years!) for the entrée course and went with a Grenache blend, Barroche “Signature” Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Rhone, 2013.

“CDP, and this one in particular, has really great acid so it’s light on its feet,” Amanda adds.  “That lemon we serve on the side with the classic preparation of Michael’s short rib is so important to use it. It cuts the fat, and that’s the role the wine plays here.  CDP has 13 varietals and people usually work with 3 of them, Grenache, Syrah and Mouvedre.  Here the Syrah plays with the spice of the peppercorn.  There’s a smokiness in tar and tabacco, too, which will always work well with Cypress Tavern’s wood grill fire.”

For tickets, visit cypresstavern.com/slowfires, and follow Amanda’s Wine Wednesday and Thirsty Thursday posts this week as more tasting and pairing notes unfold for next Tuesday’s special dinner, including its Bill Pay Buck cocktail featuring Absout Elyx.