Make a Fall Evening in the Miami Design District with Music & Michael’s Genuine®

Compliments to the chef.  And of the Miami Design District!  As we head into a new season here in South Florida, our menu at Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink experiences a little more than daily changes.  Chef de Cuisine Tim Piazza is working in everything from Butternut and Delicata squash, to Honeycrisp apples and Brussels Sprouts and building new dishes around them.  With weekly complimentary concerts in Palm Court, now is the time to get a taste of autumn and make a night of it in the neighborhood.

The Miami Design District kicks off its Performance Series Presented by Knight Foundation this Friday, October 13 with Latin Grammy Nominated and Billboard Latin Music Award Winners, Il Volo.  MGFD gets in the spirit with Coco Loco  ($10) coconut water, rum, pineapple, housemade grenadine, lime and Luxardo, served out of its freshly tapped, green coconut.  Just look for the coconut-strewn bar in front of Ella, where you can also find a selection of wine, beer, water and yes, fresh coconut water, too.  See the schedule posted here, and look forward to a new act each week (Fridays, 6PM, Palm Court 140 NE 39th Street), with the Miami Symphony Orchestra back monthly.  Street, Palm Court Garage and Valet Parking available.   Here are how the leaves fall on the menu (new cocktails at the MGFD bar with Beverage Manager Amanda Fraga and desserts by pastry chef MJ Garcia will be covered in separate posts over the next week!):

Braised Rabbit Leg with roasted cipollini onion, bacon, mustard, whole wheat crepe

“The funny thing is, of course, we live in Miami so it still feels like summer outside but we want to feel the change despite that,” says Piazza.  “The goal is to create dishes that are full of all those ingredients and flavors we love this time of year, but that aren’t too rich or heavy handed.  This what we do best in a nutshell — balance.”

In that case, he’s struck it.  Wood Oven Roasted Sweet Potato becomes a salad with the addition of sprouted lentils, pretty tokyo turnips, peppery upland cress, and the nutty acid of tahini sauce.  A dusting of Aleppo chile gives it that zesty pop. We all look forward to apples turning up, and the pick of the grove for the chefs is the Honeycrisp for its perfect harmony of sweet and tart.  Piazza highlights its crunchy texture tossing it shaved with aromatic fennel in Apple & Fennel Salad, red onion, sunflower seeds, radish, quinoa, greens, goat cheese and mustard vinaigrette.  Luscious Skirt Steak hits refresh with celery, almonds, dates, horseradish crema and sherry.  Click here for a reservation or call 305.573.5550.

 

Pumpkin Spice… Bacon? Hinckley’s Fancy Meats Trunk Show Rolls into Michael’s Genuine® Next Tuesday

Packing The Charcuterie Box for shipment. Duck Ham, Bacon Liverwurst, Tasso, Antelope Sausage, Duck Rillette, Spuma di lardo, country pate, head cheese terrine.

Pumpkin Spice Bacon What.

The best wurst, handled with care.  After hitting his Kickstarter funding goal of $25K to take Hinckley’s Fancy Meats to the next level with nationwide shipping, chef/owner Matt Hinckley is rolling up a Yeti cooler full of his Florida-sourced and cured heritage product to Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink so we can have a taste of the goods.  Join us at MGFD on Tuesday, October 17 for Happy Hour beginning at 4:30 p.m., then Dinner from 5:30-11 p.m. as Matt pops special dishes onto the MGFD menu a la carte, with select charcuterie available for purchase to take home.  Reservations (305.573.5550) and walk-ins welcome!

DISHES

Charcuterie Plate hunter’s terrine. bacon liverwurst. duck rillette. fancy mustard. crostini.
BBQ Spare Ribs charred scallions.
Wood Oven Roasted Pumpkin hinckley’s fancy bacon. goat cheese. brown butter vinaigrette. sage.
Meatlover’s Pizza florida ham. hinckley’s fancy bacon. tasso. fontina. arugula.
Rabbit & Smoked Pig Head Roulade pickled veggies. bitter greens.

TRUNK SHOW MEATS 

Pumpkin Spice Bacon $17/lb.
Grass Fed Sirloin Steaks $26/lb.
Mexican Chorizo $14/lb.
Wild Boar Breakfast Sausage $15/lb.
Grass Fed Bacon Burger $14/lb
Duck Hams (2 ea.) $10
Tasso (2 ea.) $14
Smoked Antelope Sausage $17/lb.
Bone Broth $4/pt.

Meatballing the right way!

Matt makes seasonal creations and limited runs, like Holiday Hams (make your holiday gift list now, people!) and what is this about Pumpkin Spice Bacon in his Butcher CSA Subscription and also shipping nationwide (free for orders over $150 with coupon code FREE SHIPPING)?  A whole applewood and cinnamon bark smoked slab of it would make you some friends.  If this isn’t familiar enough, there are plenty of offerings crafted with the home cook in mind like Meatball Mix made with Central Florida beef raised on grass pasture mixed with fresh pork and HFM pancetta. Make meatball sandwiches, put it in pasta, or stuff some veggies.  It’s incredible to see this fledgling Orlando-based nose-to-tail butcher shop getting it done with a new nationwide marketplace. Now you can have access to the same quality ingredients for your kitchen that chefs use in the best restaurants in the country and do your part in making a better and more transparent food system for everyone!

 

Toast Your Holiday Party Genuinely with this Gift from Michael Schwartz Events

Michael Schwartz Events makes holiday parties shine and guests feel special. Let our team host your corporate or annual festive gathering for friends and family at one Chef’s unique restaurant concepts. Or a venue of your choosing, off-site.

CHEERS TO THE SEASON.  BOOK A HOLIDAY PARTY BY OCTOBER 31.  RESERVE ONE HOUR OF OPEN BAR & ENJOY A SECOND HOUR ON US!

Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink
Harry’s Pizzeria®
ella pop café

From easy, crowd-pleasing pizza parties with our mobile oven, to over-the-top unforgettable occasions with bubbles and special sweet treats, email Lindsay@michaelschwartzevents.com or call 786.708.6826 to get a jump on it with menu ideas, decor and a seasoned team to staff it all.  Planning starts now!

[RECIPE] We Fancy Cheese Puffs | Playing the Temperature Game for Perfect Choux Pastry in Gougères

Wednesday’s Rancher Appreciation Supper (tickets and menu here) at Harry’s Pizzeria® is about more than meats the eye.  The occasion is a celebration of delicious product from a source we trust and can stand behind, a commitment that Michael is making long term for our neighborhood American pizzeria as it grows.  Beef and pork raised right, tastes right.  But what happens behind the scenes to make it all happen for the dinner on the culinary end orchestrates resources and talent across our group, from menu development to execution.

This morning we visited our commissary kitchen where much of the heavy lifting for prep happens for our restaurants and special events to zero in on the process through the humble cheese puff or gougère.  A flurry of activity since 5:00 a.m. dances around not skipping a beat from one item, one hot minute, to the next, cooks methodically Sharpie-striking the day’s butcher paper prep list taped to glass racks. MJ keeps her cool “off to get [her] ass kicked” on the next thing.  Jean checks on Michael’s Genuine’s pastrami in the cabinet smoker wafting a peppery sweetness over the range where MJ begins her pâte à choux.  The key throughout the process is use of temperature and its control.

“What I love about the choux dough is it is so rustic. You have to really get in there with your hands to make something beautiful and simple,” she explains, bringing the water, milk, salt and sugar to a boil in a saucepan before adding the butter and then the flour, paddling, turning and whipping with a wooden spoon aggressively. “Instead of a raising agent like yeast or baking soda, we use a mechanical leavener — moisture from fat and the steam that escapes when heated.”

You’re looking for the “V” to form and then it’s ready to pipe.

MJ prefers her base with a little more flavor so she cuts the water with equal parts milk, adjusting the butter accordingly.  Keeping an eye on moisture content and knowing what to look for at the various stages of cooking will yield the right result.  She likes to finish cooking it by drying it as much as she can on the range.  Looking for a film to form on the bottom of the sauce pan, MJ then takes it just a tad longer over the heat.

“I’m looking for it to become dry enough to sustain the structure of the dough when I add the eggs later,” she adds.  They’ll be tempered with the help of the whiz of a gigantic paddle in the smaller (30 quart) of her two Hobart mixers and a paint job she learned back in culinary school — spreading the dough on the sides of the mixing bowl to let just the right amount of steam escape before adding the eggs so they incorporate perfectly.

“When you are trained originally in pastry you start with traditional French patisserie to learn the basics,” MJ reflects.  “I always rely on the foundation of the technique, but it’s the instinct for cues in the behavior of the technique that develop over time and serve to make a recipe really work.”

Gougères

Yields about 3 dozen

1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 cup whole milk
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces
1 scant cup all-purpose flour
5 large eggs, at room temperature
3/4 cups gruyère, shredded
1/4 cup grated parmigiano reggiano

Pre-heat oven to 375° F.

In a saucepan over medium-high heat bring salt, sugar, milk, 1/2 cup of water and butter to a boil, mixing to combine with a wooden spoon.  When a froth begins to form, turn the heat to medium-low and add the flour.  Mix with wooden spoon continuously for 3-4 minutes or until a light film forms on the bottom. Keep stirring vigorously for another minute or two to dry the dough so it easily pulls away from the pan.  It should have a smooth, paste-like texture. Remove from the heat.  Using the wooden spoon, scoop the dough and spread on the sides of bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment.  This will allow just enough heat to escape before adding the eggs to ease their tempering.  Add the eggs one by one and beat until the dough is thick and shiny, making sure that each egg is completely incorporated before adding the next.  Don’t worry if the dough looks like spaeztle as the eggs are beaten in, this is normal; the dough will come together again.  Let the dough sit for a minute, then beat in the grated cheese. You’re looking for the dough to form a stiff “V” on the paddle, then you are ready to pipe.  Using a rubber spatula, scoop dough into a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip for better control when piping.

Line two baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper — if you are using parchment, you can pipe a small bit of dough on the corners and in the center of the sheet to use as glue for the paper.  Pipe about 1 tablespoon of dough for each gougère leaving about 2 inches between the mounds. Sprinkle each with a little parmigiano.

Slide the baking sheets into the oven and immediately turn the oven temperature down to 325 degrees F.  The initial blast of heat will activate the steam and make them rise, then lowering will dry them out without burning them.  Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the gougères are golden and puffed.  You an also pull one from the oven to test for moisture inside and continue to bake accordingly.  Serve warm, or transfer the pans to racks to cool.

[RECIPE] Oven Roasted Gold Bar Squash with Arubella Cheese, Prosciutto & Soft Herbs

Gold bars ahead!

“Quality is never an accident,” chef recently scribbled on his office closet door.  When we speak of what quality and its companion, creativity, mean in a kitchen or to dish creation specifically, out of the box thinking, big ideas and originality come to mind.  But would it take some of the magic away if what is really at play is much more grounded?  That instead of some high falutin divination, it’s a process — not unlike recipe-writing itself — that is detailed in every way.  I am starting to see it as an algorithm based on timing: what is seasonal, what is available and what is the context.  This produces the best creativity, and when the chefs nail it, it falls into focus.  A dish becomes instructive and expressive of the approach.  The why is in the how.

Words to stand by, and for, at The Genuine Hospitality Group.

Take Oven Roasted Gold Bar Squash with Arubella Cheese & Prosciutto, little bundles of the perfect, simple bite and part of the first course of next Wednesday’s Rancher Appreciation Supper at Harry’s Pizzeria® in the Design District.  As culinary assistant Megan Hess explains, “This dish is an opportunity to highlight three ingredients that each work to add something to the equation. The squash is something seasonal and fresh. Belgioioso’s Arubella cheese – think Taleggio – shows up all over the menu at Harry’s, from pizza to salad, so we wanted to rethink its potential and uses.  And the prosciutto, while we would be happy eating it out of the package, is something we don’t get to use everyday in the restaurant nor as an ingredient in a dish. It works great here to wrap it all together.”

Enjoy our calculations in your home kitchen, but first get a taste of the gold standard by purchasing tickets here!

Oven Roasted Gold Bar Squash with Arubella Cheese, Prosciutto & Soft Herbs

Serves 4 as an appetizer

10-12 baby squash, preferably Gold Bar
1 cup shredded Arabella cheese
½ pound sliced Niman Ranch prosciutto
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt & freshly cracked black pepper to taste
1/4 cup picked parsley
1/4 cup picked cilantro
Juice of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 450°F.

Cut each squash lengthwise. Sandwich some cheese in between the zucchini halves, pressing and shaping to secure. Wrap each bundle with a piece of prosciutto. Place each stuffed squash on a sheet tray about an inch apart, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until cheese is bubbling and prosciutto has lightly crisped. Toss parsley, cilantro, lemon and olive oil in a bowl. Present squash family-style on a platter topped with soft herbs and serve immediately.