It Takes Two to Tango the Amara Beverage Book — Part II: Wine

“Because at the end of the night, she says ‘Champagne?'”

It’s happy hour at Michael’s Genuine® a few weeks back, and Amara’s Sommelier Amanda Fraga has placed one of her favorite sparkling wines, Roederer Estate, in front of colleague Maria Pottage.

Flute-free Zone: Fraga holding court if only for a Happy Hour at her old stomping grounds, Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink.

“People say Champagne all day, but let’s be honest, it’s going to get expensive when you’re the one paying for it!,” she jokes.  “It’s tough to have a favorite, because it’s like talking about kids, but this is one of my favorite sparkling wines. Roederer does an amazing job, and I can afford to have multiple bottles.  It may not be French, but it’s Champagne method, not bubble injections.”

We’re continuing our deep dive into the Amara Beverage Book, having transitioned from cocktails to something even more festive with Fraga as our guide.  She sees every glass of wine like traveling and visiting a new place.   When your new place is a new restaurant with a new menu, the journeys are endless in building a wine list.  The process of discovery is winding, sometimes hidden from view.

“Because of Amara’s cuisine, I felt slightly out of my comfort zone,” Fraga explains. “The culinary team was going to Buenos Aires for their research trip, and I’m thinking, this is one if the countries I drank the least of!”

Sommelier Amanda Fraga with her rosé, which happens to be ON-TAP (!)

It was at this point that she remembered who she worked for.  The Genuine Hospitality Group wasn’t an ordinary restaurant group with a literal approach. There was room for interpretation.  Sure there would be Malbec…  There had to be and should be, but not 30, with some Cabs to round it out.

“I feel like everyone thinks Latin American wines are only from Chile and Argentina,” she continues. “The idea was to have the coolest wines from Latin America at large and to not forget our roots of fresh and genuine. There is so much diversity in what’s growing and being produced from South to Central America. You have more familiar grapes like Pinot Noir, Albarino and Tempranillo, juxtaposed with Tennat, Listan Negro (the mission grape) and el Pais. It’s the perfect storm.”

Fraga’s passion for education comes from a visceral place, stemming from a drive to expand her own wine knowledge through experience, travel being one of the most salient — a potent source for inspiration that sticks.  As she sees, relating those experiences to her staff is one of her most important jobs in training — the story behind the bottle that leaves an impression.  Her innovative approach to training is predicated on a consistent curriculum and engaging the staff through “Wine Wednesday” trainings on various topics including the importance of backstory and context in wine not just the taste profiles.  They’re catalogued, little nuggets of wine knowledge framed by a narrative on who made the wine and where it came from, on the restaurant’s Instagram at #amarabeveragebook.  It’s something she developed as sommelier of Michael’s Genuine & Beverage Manager for The Genuine Hospitality Group, a useful tool grounding her training process.

Traditional, funky Prosecco, the first Wine Wednesday post at Amara. She explains, “Delicate. nice acid. good fruit. It’s not the Prosecco you know but if you’re a lover of Italy and have an open mind and heart you’re going to love it.”

Balanced with her knowledge of what our guests enjoy drinking guiding balanced by a compass pointing south, the list netted out 35% Latin America, which although not a majority is a focus on which to build, and more than Fraga has ever worked with before.  In 2015 she participated in a competition among Miami sommeliers to build the best wine bar, counter tops and all, hosted by Wines of Chile.  Although Amara was a faint glimmer in her glass and Director of Licensing Operations Eric Larkee’s team poured victorious, she reflects now on this intensive, apt primer that opened her eyes to what was out there.

“I realized the incredible variation even Chile has in itself,” she continues. “Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Syrah, Malbec , Pinot Noir… There’s so much and the great thing now even three years later is that there is much more being imported in the US.”

It’s at this point I realize something, too.  I’m actually enjoying the Verdejo she’s chosen for me, and this is exactly the point.  The only way you truly know something and understand it is through exposure.  Repeated exposure to new things, even when you think they’re the old thing.  The old thing can surprise you.

“I never had it before [Michael’s Genuine® sommelier] Dean put it on the list,” she recounts.  “I kind of wanted to give you something fun and different, and I feel like you appreciate these things. It’s fun to smell a wine and not automatically be able to guess it but know that it sure does remind you of something.  You try to point to where you had it before.  So we are playing this game now… I know you wanted something white and now we have something that piqued your interest, and curiosity, too.”

For herself, Amanda is settling into the Jean Claude Boisset
, a sparkling rosé from Burgundy Dean has had by the glass for about a month now that she’s wanted to try.  She wanted something light and refreshing and had given Maria the Roederer already.

“I’m pretty sure it’s Chardonnay-Pinot Noir…” she thinks out loud.  Familiar yet at the same time foreign.  Herein lies the balance that creates the magnetism of intrigue, stirring curiosity just enough.  The game continues.

Preshift on Biscayne Bay, the place where it all comes together.

Drink 100% California, To California

On Sunday, it’s time to come together to drink and eat in support of the folks impacted by the California fires.  Join us for some amazing wines and charcuterie and cheese from Michael Schwartz Events with the contributions of so many more generous restaurants and wine purveyors at Wolfe’s Wine Shoppe for 100% FROM THE 305 from 1-4PM.  The event is a 100% donation to the Napa Valley Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund.  To support and attend make a $100 pledge here bring or email Jeffrey@wolfeswines.com your donation receipt.  Alternatively, bring a check made out to the Napa Valley Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund the day of the event.

“Signorello burnt down,” sommelier and Director of Partnership Operations Eric Larkee says.  “That’s a winery we have had on the list at Michael’s Genuine® in the past, their Cab. Napa seems to be really hit hard. lt could be 7-8 years for them to produce wines from their own vineyards again… for it to be in the bottle, in the restaurant. That’s as bad as it gets. Total loss, including the cellar.”

SOMMELIER DEAN FORST’S THREE CALI WINES TO DRINK RIGHT NOW AT MGFD: 1. Honig, Cabernet Sauvignon Napa $88 easy drinking, fruit forward, very approachable 2. Janzen Cabernet Sauvignon Napa $120  arrives TODAY.. delishhhh, fruit bomb, cocoa notes, long finish 3 Kamen Cabernet Sauvignon Sonoma $168 Chewy tannins, elegant, silky, dry.

He explains the possibilities for damage — how enormous and varied they can be.  Consider Cabernet Sauvignon, the bigger styles, where grapes are harvested later. Many may still be out in the fields.  Then there is the loss of control over fermentation tanks in wineries that lost power. Smoke taint is the silent killer, especially with Pinot and Chardonnay, something revealed by the Anderson Valley fires a couple of years ago.

“It won’t show until it’s in the bottle,” he continues. “The wine could taste like an ash tray when you pop the cork.  Or it could be gorgeous.  I could get more wonky here with the chemistry at play.”

So how does this affect supply?  The 2017 vintage could be non-existent or very limited for Napa and Sonoma.  But this doesn’t mean prices will skyrocket.  Larkee explains it’s not a pure supply and demand thing, which begins to make sense.

“You’re not going to raise prices for something that isn’t good. And It could entirely not effect us at all at the restaurants,” he says.  “Vineyard damage is actually limited, and what is at the wineries are more collection items.  It will be about 2-4 years before we will see what’s really going on and the collateral damage.”

Sunday’s event is a time to come together and celebrate what we love about these wines and why we need to do something to help.  And there are so many ways.  There will be a silent auction of high end California wines, as well as a grab wine pull for $25 a bag.  All the wines offered at the event will be for sale or order with proceeds going to the Fund, as well.  TGHG sommelier and beverage Manager Amanda Fraga along with other amazing Miami somms Daniel Toral and Brian Grandison will be keeping your glasses full of California wine from Wolfe’s distributor partners Florida Wine Co., Artisanal, Progress, and Stacole Fine Wines and Breakthru/Augustan, and you’ll have a Riedel glass to take home.

 

Get Your Claws On Stone Crab Week at Michael’s Genuine®

It’s time to get cracking! Stonies are back and so is our week of living large at Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink, because that’s just what we do in Miami this time of year.  And we have our genie in a bottle, sommelier and The Genuine Hospitality Group beverage manager Amanda Fraga to thank.

To celebrate the arrival of one of this season’s most anticipated local ingredients, for each pound of large Florida Stone Crabs from Monday, October 23 to Sunday, October 29, choose any — ANY — bottle of wine on what I believe to be one of the truly most exciting, dynamic and exceptional lists around for the table for half off.  All bottles are fair game, available at lunch, afternoon, dinner and brunch, all week long!  From sparkling to creamy, it all pairs as far as we are concerned.  Pop in and join us on a Design District stroll for afternoon menu or happy hour, or book a reservation for lunch dinner or brunch in advance at reservations@michaelsgenuine.com or 305 573 5550. From sparkling to red and all the rosé in between, treat yo self in advance of the trick!

Thirsty Thursday, Naturally

“Change happens naturally, and it’s happening all the time,” says Amanda Fraga. “It’s a style that’s inherent to the wine program at Genuine, just like it is in the kitchen.”

Fraga, sommelier and beverage manager at The Genuine Hospitality Group, explains this way of working grounds the restaurant by shaking things up, especially with wines by the glass.  This serves an important purpose for the guest, facilitating trial. It’s a great way for people to try new things without making a big commitment.  They can comfortably step out of their comfort zone.  This dynamic environment not only keeps things fresh and exciting for our guests, but works in much the same way for our team in the restaurant, who is used to experiencing and then having to quickly learn the gamut and describe in approachable terms to diners.  From new grapes and producers, to places of origin and food pairings, it’s an exercise in training and translation on the fly.  Fraga is inspired by their initiative, out of the restaurant, too.

“When they go out to eat, most of our servers are naturally challenging themselves to try new things, interesting wines… Barolo… Nebbiolo,” she continues.  “The lifespan of most by the glass on our list is about 2-3 months, maybe less. Staff will adapt. They are used to changes and their wine knowledge speaks to that.”

So what brings about the change?  Fraga likes to make sure to include a variety of styles and price points.

“I never want to be out of touch with what our guests want to drink,” she says.
“Sometimes I taste a wine when I’m out and just have to have it so people can experience it.”

Other times, it’s more deliberate, out of necessity by virtue of type of wines she brings in.  Smaller producers who are doing interested things — making things naturally with no additives or artificial processes — tend to have more limited supply and will usually run out quicker than others and need to be replaced.   This has trained Fraga to basically be anticipating what the next move is. All the time.  Then, there are the rare occasions when she’ll get a lead.  A trusted friend in the business recommends a new importer to taste with and they bring something cool.

“This basically never happens, so when it does I’m tasting with them right away,” she explains. “Recently my mentor Daniel Toral told me about this small distributor from New York.  He was like, ‘You have to taste with this guy.'”

Seeing how the Chamlija held up against the spice in our octopus set up.

And taste she did, with Greg from City Beautiful, who had just been in the Canary Islands.  Bermejo, a rosado from Lanzarote, known for its volcanic soil and lunar landscape, really impressed her for its likeness to provencal rosé.  Those beloved calling cards — pale pink to orange color, nice rounded acid and hints of stone fruit, light to medium body — not the typical darker fruited expressions of Italian or Spanish origin.  Could this in turn effortlessly engender affinity amongst fans of the classic French style, where it all began, and offer a peek through new glasses?  Why, of course, the perfect segue at the table.

sommelier Dean Forst!

Listan negro is referred to the mission grape since the Spaniards brought it with them to the New World. You’ll hear it called pais in South America,” she says. “This wine is great because it’s familiar but different, so a natural introduction for rosé fans.  Or, if a couple had wanted to go with a bottle of red for the meal, perhaps they would like to share a glass with the oysters they ordered to start?  It’s a bonus.  Enjoy a few sips to accentuate the shellfish.  That’s the beauty of the glass.”

As for trying new things, tasting is baked into the job description and moments like being presented with a (vetted) Turkish wine are ones that Fraga trains for and relishes.  She tastes and tastes, and tastes again (the second sip is really where you can discern flavor profile, anyway)  The what-do-I-like, what-do-my-guests-like and where-can-we-meet-in-the-middle at various points on the sliding scale being the guiding paradigm at play.  She might like something for her own shelf but it doesn’t always mean it’s the right for the restaurant.  Chamlija made the cut.  The call was a simple one. Just don’t ask her to pronounce it!
“I’m going to put a Turkish wine on the list, it better be a Turkish grape!”
Try the Papaskarasi, chamlija “blanc de noirs” thrace, turkey 2015 (13/glass) and Listan Negro, los bermejos, lanzarote, canary islands, spain 2016 (15/glass) as of yesterday (Wine Wednesday!) at Michael’s Genuine and follow @quepasamanda and #mgfdwine on Instagram.  Open your eyes and palate to change.  It all starts with a second taste!

#SOBEWFF 10 Years of Genuine Menu & More #MGFD10 Fun to Come

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As we like to say… Menu subject to change :)

#thisismgfd. We began this hashtag in September, welcoming a new chef into the fold to steward Michael’s flagship into its 10th year of genuine hospitality.  Now we begin another as we approach March 13 when the Champagne will be flowing to give thanks for all that came before and forge ahead into a brave new future.  Today, we’re sharing for the first time the menu for our Thursday, February 23 South Beach Wine & Food Festival dinner.  We are so honored to have respected and dear friends chefs Marc Vetri and Jonathan Waxman join Michael to celebrate the meaning of Genuine.  I think it’s safe to say that it’s the genuine culture and community that has made this restaurant what it is, embracing and fostering Michael’s vision to make Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink bigger than itself.  It is this we toast and cherish, the people that make Genuine mean something.  Follow #MGFD10 as it unfolds, because there’s more to come, and click here for tickets before we run out. 

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Michael and Jim at Au Bon Climat, Santa Maria Valley, blending Lua Rossa no. 3 in 2015.

This year we also crafted an online auction package for the festival which we’re pretty excited about (the kind we’d want to buy ourselves, as it should be!)  Gather 4 friends and sidle up to the heirloom tomato wall as Michael and Brad cook for you at the Michael’s Genuine® Food & Drink wood oven station. The beating heart and hearth of the MGFD kitchen since we opened in 2007 is your stage for a multi-course meal paired with iconic, library wines significant to Genuine from Michael’s friend and Lua Rossa collaborator Jim Clendenen of Au Bon Climat.  Get your bid in here now, or regret it later!